RLROUSE Directory & Informational Resources
Home     Add URL     Edit Listing     Infoblog     Picture of the Day     Privacy Policy     Advertise     About us     Write for us     Contact us     Sitemap
Sunday, May 28, 2017

 

Lemon Laws: Protection Against Defective Products

How Lemon Laws protect your rights when you buy a defective item


 
Have you recently purchased an automobile that has a persistent problem? Perhaps you have placed it in the shop three or four times since you have had it? If so, you have bought a "lemon". Well, you don't have to be "stuck" with it!

All fifty states have enacted lemon laws that ensure that you won't have to pay for a car that simply cannot be fixed. In addition, the federal government has enacted the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act which provides an "implied warranty" for all products that cost over $25.

Lemon Laws vary a bit from state to state, but their purpose is the same: if your car cannot be brought into compliance with the warranty after a certain number of repair attempts, the dealer must exchange it for a new one.

Also, many companies that sell consumer products have their own version of a "lemon law" in place. Most major computer retailers, for example, will replace your under-warranty PC if they have to fix it three or four times under the warranty.

If you have purchased a lemon and the seller refuses to make it right, it might be worth your while to consult an attorney. You don't want to end up making payments on a major purchase that is constantly having problems, especially after the warranty has expired!

Make sure the Lemon Laws work for you!


More Interesting Articles
 



 

 
Home     Add URL     Infoblog     Picture of the Day     Privacy Policy     Advertise     About us     Write for us     Report a broken link     Contact us     Sitemap
 
2003-2016 RLROUSE.COM, Abingdon, Va

RLROUSE.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program
designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.